Scot-ale


Scot-ale
Combination of Scot = contribution + ale = festival or holiday at which ale was drunk. It was paid for by drinkers' contributions or share of the cost, usually exacted at the church by the vicar, sometimes by the lord of the *manor. -

Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases. .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • scot-ale — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Pub — Typisch britischer Pub (The Clarence) in London …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Scotal — Scot al, Scotale Scot ale, n. [Scot + ale.] (O. Eng. Law) The keeping of an alehouse by an officer of a forest, and drawing people to spend their money for liquor, for fear of his displeasure. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scotale — Scotal Scot al, Scotale Scot ale, n. [Scot + ale.] (O. Eng. Law) The keeping of an alehouse by an officer of a forest, and drawing people to spend their money for liquor, for fear of his displeasure. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bridale — Lit. bride ale . Ale drinking at a wedding. Cf. Scot ale …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Medale — A festival or party with ale held to celebrate the successful mowing of the lord s *meadow. [< OldEngl. meed = meadow + ale] Cf. Scot ale …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • drinceléan — n ( es/ ) tributary drink, scot ale, the contribution of tenants to purchase ale for the entertainment of their lord or his steward on the fee. Or perhaps the ale given by the seller to the buyer on concluding a bargain …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • drynceléan — n ( es/ ) scot ale, the ale given by a seller to a buyer on concluding a bargain …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • yill — /yil/, n. Scot. ale. * * * …   Universalium

  • Whitsun — The holiday and festival days celebrating Whit Sunday or *Pente cost. Parishes celebrated with games and much *scot ale. The word is OldEngl. Hwita Sunnandasg, i.e. White Sunday. The first component Whit (white) comes from the custom of the newly …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases


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